MAINBLOG: nickbutt


18+ ONLY, PLEASE LEAVE IF YOU ARE UNDER THE AGE OF 18

death, injuries, surgeries, genetic disorders, occasionally other people's art, etc.
nsfw nsfl please leave if you are of a nervous disposition as the content here is very graphic

biomedicalephemera:

Top: Rodent ulcer of twelve years duration (spontaneous cicatrization [sealing off; stopping spreading])

Bottom: Rodent ulcer of sixteen years duration (Terebant [Piercing] type)

Rodent ulcers” (also known as Jacobi ulcers) are so named due to their rat-gnawed appearance.
They are a manifestation of basal-cell carcinoma (BCC), and while they’re rarely fatal, they have the potential to be extremely disfiguring. Unlike most BCCs, rodent ulcers have significant central necrotization, leading to more tissue damage.

While the extreme destruction seen on these two patients is no longer commonplace in the developed world, treatment and removal of these ulcers can be very expensive, and they often recur, even with treatment. As they don’t often kill and often strike the very elderly, with removal frequently being more painful than the ulcer itself, basal-cell carcinoma is of the few cancers that is often simply monitored, rather than aggressively treated.

In Caucasian people, up to 30% of adults will develop some form of this cancer in their lifetimes. The most common cause is significant unprotected sun exposure, but genetics also plays a role in susceptibility. Thankfully, rodent ulcers are one of the less-common presentations.

Diseases of the Skin. James H. Sequeira, 1919.

Henri Regnault - Execution Without Judgment under the Moorish Kings of Granada

sixpenceee:

JOINTS IN MOTION

As said by IFL science

Cameron Drake of San Francisco has created a collection of magnificent images showing joints in motion. He was aided by orthopedic physician Dr. Noah Weiss and the finished product is completely amazing. If you’d like to know more about the project, please check out Drake’s blog.

howtoskinatiger:

Pregnant ewe after being attacked by a coyote. The injuries were so severe the ewe had to be euthanized. 
(Source)

howtoskinatiger:

Pregnant ewe after being attacked by a coyote. The injuries were so severe the ewe had to be euthanized. 

(Source)

malformalady:

Dermestid beetles being used to clean a human skull at Skulls Unlimited International, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Dermestid beetles are destructive to a number of common items. Natural animal fibers such as wool, silk, cotton, linen, fur, or feathers are more prone to attack than synthetic fibers. Dermestids are also known to attack chocolate, copra, and cocoa beans. Most damage is done by the larval stage of the beetle, while adults feed on flowers and shrubs.
Photo credit: Sklmsta

malformalady:

Dermestid beetles being used to clean a human skull at Skulls Unlimited International, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Dermestid beetles are destructive to a number of common items. Natural animal fibers such as wool, silk, cotton, linen, fur, or feathers are more prone to attack than synthetic fibers. Dermestids are also known to attack chocolate, copra, and cocoa beans. Most damage is done by the larval stage of the beetle, while adults feed on flowers and shrubs.

Photo credit: Sklmsta

dog-guts:

river rafting accident

dog-guts:

river rafting accident

backspatter:

The 21 Steps of an Autopsy

The dead body arrives at the morgue.
The body’s identity is confirmed, assigned an identification number, and given a toe tag, which is a cardboard ticket with all of the corpse’s pertinent information written on it. This tag is tied to the big toe.
The body is photographed from head to toe, front and back, in the clothing it was wearing when it arrived at the morgue.
The body is photographed from head to toe, front and back, completly naked.
The body is weighed on a scale, and the weight is recorded. The body is also measured for length, and completely X-rayed.
The fingerprints of the corpse are taken. In instances in which hands and/or fingers are missing parts are duly noted.
The clothing the deceased was wearing upon arrival at the morgue is carefully examined. Fiber samples from the garments are taken for later study, and stains on clothing are noted and examined.
Any and all moles, wounds, tattoos, scars (including surgical scars), and other physical body anomalies are noted and examined.
The corpse’s fingernails, toenails, skin, and hair are examined. The skin on the arms and legs is carefully checked for syringe markings.
During a medical autopsy of a female, a rigorous examination of the external genitalia (labia, pubic hair, etc) is performed to determine whether or not there was a rape or sexual assault committed against the woman prior to (and/or after) her death.
Body fluids (blood, urine, etc) are withdrawn from the body and subjected to comprehensive toxicology tests.
The coroner makes a huge, full body-length “Y” incision that opens up the entire front of the body. The incision starts at each shoulder, proceeds on an angle down to the mid-chest, and then joins into a straight line that extends all the way to the pubis. This is the most dramatic element of a medical-legal autopsy, and most people who have never seen one performed are stunned by the dramatic way the body is spread wide by this incision. Many people have, at one time or another, seen some sort of surgical procedure performed. The incisions, even for major abdominal surgery, are thin, neat, and relatively “clean.” An autopsy incision need not be neat, nor concerned with excessive bleeding. Thus, the corpse is split wide open by a deep cut that is a very effective reminder that the person being autopsied is, in fact, quite dead.
First the organs of the upper abdominal cavity-the lungs, heart, esophagus and trachea-are removed. The coroner then takes out the lower abdominal organs, which include the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenals, stomach, and intestines. Slices of each organ are taken and tested.
The internal genitalia of both males and females are examined. In the case of females, the uterus and vagina are carefully studied for signs of pregnancy, rape, or some form of sexual assault.
The organs of the pelvic region, including the bladder, the uterus, and the ovaries, are removed. Samples of each organ are taken and analyzed.
When the cause of death are either drowning or a suspected poisoning or drug overdose, the contents of the stomach are removed, examined, and carefully analyzed. All findings are recorded.
Any and all bullet wounds are recorded. The number of wounds is noted, as well as the perceived direction(s) of the bullet(s). An estimate, based on the configuration of the bullet entrance wounds, is made as to what distance the gun was from the victim when it was fired. All bullets are removed from the body and placed in plastic bags. The bullets are then examined and recorded as evidence.
First, a deep incision is made in the skin of the scalp. The cut, which is called intermastiod, begins behind one ear, travels over the top of the head, and ends behind the opposite ear. The scalp is then grasped firmly and pulled forward over the face, baring the skull. Using an electric saw, a wedge-shaped portion of the skull is cut out and removed, exposing the brain. The brain is then removed in its entirety, weighed, and examined.
Since he or she is now through with them, the coroner returns all of the removed internal organs to the body cavities.
The autopsy findings, complete with a final opinion as to the cause of death, as well as all reports and photographs, are turned over to legal authorities. This “package” becomes part of the corpus delecti, and is used as evidence in a court of law when necessary. The folder containing all of this detailed information is known as the case file.
A final determination is made as to the cause of death, and the death certificate is filled out.
The body is turned over to the funeral director the family has selected. The body is then prepared for burial, cremation, or donation.

backspatter:

The 21 Steps of an Autopsy

  • The dead body arrives at the morgue.
  • The body’s identity is confirmed, assigned an identification number, and given a toe tag, which is a cardboard ticket with all of the corpse’s pertinent information written on it. This tag is tied to the big toe.
  • The body is photographed from head to toe, front and back, in the clothing it was wearing when it arrived at the morgue.
  • The body is photographed from head to toe, front and back, completly naked.
  • The body is weighed on a scale, and the weight is recorded. The body is also measured for length, and completely X-rayed.
  • The fingerprints of the corpse are taken. In instances in which hands and/or fingers are missing parts are duly noted.
  • The clothing the deceased was wearing upon arrival at the morgue is carefully examined. Fiber samples from the garments are taken for later study, and stains on clothing are noted and examined.
  • Any and all moles, wounds, tattoos, scars (including surgical scars), and other physical body anomalies are noted and examined.
  • The corpse’s fingernails, toenails, skin, and hair are examined. The skin on the arms and legs is carefully checked for syringe markings.
  • During a medical autopsy of a female, a rigorous examination of the external genitalia (labia, pubic hair, etc) is performed to determine whether or not there was a rape or sexual assault committed against the woman prior to (and/or after) her death.
  • Body fluids (blood, urine, etc) are withdrawn from the body and subjected to comprehensive toxicology tests.
  • The coroner makes a huge, full body-length “Y” incision that opens up the entire front of the body. The incision starts at each shoulder, proceeds on an angle down to the mid-chest, and then joins into a straight line that extends all the way to the pubis. This is the most dramatic element of a medical-legal autopsy, and most people who have never seen one performed are stunned by the dramatic way the body is spread wide by this incision. Many people have, at one time or another, seen some sort of surgical procedure performed. The incisions, even for major abdominal surgery, are thin, neat, and relatively “clean.” An autopsy incision need not be neat, nor concerned with excessive bleeding. Thus, the corpse is split wide open by a deep cut that is a very effective reminder that the person being autopsied is, in fact, quite dead.
  • First the organs of the upper abdominal cavity-the lungs, heart, esophagus and trachea-are removed. The coroner then takes out the lower abdominal organs, which include the liver, spleen, kidneys, adrenals, stomach, and intestines. Slices of each organ are taken and tested.
  • The internal genitalia of both males and females are examined. In the case of females, the uterus and vagina are carefully studied for signs of pregnancy, rape, or some form of sexual assault.
  • The organs of the pelvic region, including the bladder, the uterus, and the ovaries, are removed. Samples of each organ are taken and analyzed.
  • When the cause of death are either drowning or a suspected poisoning or drug overdose, the contents of the stomach are removed, examined, and carefully analyzed. All findings are recorded.
  • Any and all bullet wounds are recorded. The number of wounds is noted, as well as the perceived direction(s) of the bullet(s). An estimate, based on the configuration of the bullet entrance wounds, is made as to what distance the gun was from the victim when it was fired. All bullets are removed from the body and placed in plastic bags. The bullets are then examined and recorded as evidence.
  • First, a deep incision is made in the skin of the scalp. The cut, which is called intermastiod, begins behind one ear, travels over the top of the head, and ends behind the opposite ear. The scalp is then grasped firmly and pulled forward over the face, baring the skull. Using an electric saw, a wedge-shaped portion of the skull is cut out and removed, exposing the brain. The brain is then removed in its entirety, weighed, and examined.
  • Since he or she is now through with them, the coroner returns all of the removed internal organs to the body cavities.
  • The autopsy findings, complete with a final opinion as to the cause of death, as well as all reports and photographs, are turned over to legal authorities. This “package” becomes part of the corpus delecti, and is used as evidence in a court of law when necessary. The folder containing all of this detailed information is known as the case file.
  • A final determination is made as to the cause of death, and the death certificate is filled out.
  • The body is turned over to the funeral director the family has selected. The body is then prepared for burial, cremation, or donation.
backspatter:

The classic Y-incision during an autopsy.

backspatter:

The classic Y-incision during an autopsy.

malformalady:

Thermal corneal burn following a curling iron mishap

malformalady:

Thermal corneal burn following a curling iron mishap

backspatter:

Post-mortem hypostasis pattern on the front of a  body found face down on a bed. The linear marks are formed  by pressure from creases in a blanket. Pallor around the mouth and nose are caused by pressure against the bed and do not necessarily indicate marks of suffocation.

backspatter:

Post-mortem hypostasis pattern on the front of a  body found face down on a bed. The linear marks are formed  by pressure from creases in a blanket. Pallor around the mouth and nose are caused by pressure against the bed and do not necessarily indicate marks of suffocation.